How We Still Look At and Talk About Indians and Their Art

adena-man-crop“When recycled nineteenth-century rhetoric about Indians overshadows such complex histories, the cultural items themselves become free-floating stand-ins for actual Native people, a process that in some ways masks colonial guilt about these tough issues. To accept outdated language is historical laziness that does broad damage. It’s a cavalier attitude, one that helps explain prevalent cultural appropriations like hipster headdresses, Hollywood Indians, and the dogged support for racist professional sports mascots.”   How We Still Look At and Talk About Indians and Their Art

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~ by Shauna Osborn on May 15, 2015.

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